MENU

Blog

This blog includes articles written by doctors and eye care professionals who work with keratoconus patients on a regular basis. We hope you find these articles and resources helpful. If you’d like to leave a comment, please register and log in.

Tear Proteomics in Keratoconus

Originally published in Contact Lens Today.

Abstract:

The purpose of this work was to identify potential tear-film based proteins expressed in keratoconus.

Recruited subjects were normal GP contact lens wearers, keratoconus subjects wearing GP contact lenses, and keratoconus subjects without contact lenses. Subjects wearing soft lenses or having previous ocular surgeries were excluded from participating. Approximately 5 microliters of tears were sampled from both eyes of each subject using glass microcapillaries.

Continue Reading
Posted In: Research Studies

Contact Lens Options for Keratoconus

Author:  Dr. Anderson, OD, FAAO

Keratoconus is a bilateral, progressive corneal thinning disorder which manifests as irregular, asymmetric astigmatism. Symptoms include blurred, subacute distorted vision which is usually more pronounced in one eye than the other. Refraction is often difficult and patients may not be adequately corrected with spectacles. Contact lenses are the best form of visual correction in most cases of clinically significant keratoconus. There are many different types of contact lenses available for keratoconus.

Continue Reading

Keratoconus Treatment Options

By Dr. Brandon Ayres, MD

Keratoconus causes progressive thinning and distortion of the cornea that affects approximately 1 in every 2000 people.  It tends to affect younger people sometimes starting in the early teen years and progresses most rapidly through the fourth decade.  As the dystrophy progresses the cornea takes on an irregular cone like shape and may develop scar tissue.  The changes in the cornea seen in keratoconus lead to “irregular astigmatism.”  

Continue Reading

Recent Hybrid Lens Technology

By Rob Davis, O.D., F.A.A.O.

In 2001, Quarter Lambda Technologies (later to become SynergEyes, Inc.) began research and development of a new hybrid contact lens design that ultimately received FDA clearance in 2005. The SynergEyes® hybrid lens differed from the original SoftPerm® design in several key areas. SynergEyes hybrid contact lenses use high oxygen permeable materials and a patented technology called “Hyperbond®” that significantly reduces the separation between the rigid and soft junction of the lens that was common in the SoftPerm® lens.

Continue Reading
Posted In: Blog

The Story of Cassidy Randle – a Sharing Vision Grant Program Recipient


The Story of Cassidy Randle – a Sharing Vision Grant Program Recipient. Cassidy is one of the first recipients of the Sharing Vision Grant program, a program designed to provide the new hybrid contact lenses ClearKone® to patients who may otherwise not have access to this new contact lens technology.  When Synergeyes was contacted by Cassidy, she was almost blind in her left eye, was unable to drive and couldn’t distinguish family faces.   Continue Reading
Posted In: Blog

I’ve Just Been Diagnosed With Keratoconus

By: David Kading, OD, FCLSA, FAAO

If you have just been diagnosed with keratoconus, let me first of all reassure you that there have been many recent advancements in the realm of keratoconus to equip eye care professionals with the proper tools to help you.

Keratoconus is a vision disorder that affects the front surface (cornea) of the eye.  The changes that take place occur because the cornea becomes thinner in certain areas. 

Continue Reading

Keratoconus Causes and Treatment Options

By: Clark Chang, OD, MS, FAAO

Keratoconus Causes

Keratoconus is a non-inflammatory, progressive corneal condition associated with corneal thinning, weakening, and steepening, resulting in corneal optical irregularities (cone shape) and poor vision. An incidence rate of 1:2000 has been reported with no known sexual or ethnic predilection. In addition, familial inheritance has been reported in 6-24% of cases and co-morbidities such as atopic disease and connective tissue diseases have also been reported in the literature.

Continue Reading

Contact Lenses vs. Surgery for Keratoconus

Contact lenses with a rigid surface are the undisputed gold standard for restoring vision in keratoconus.  Despite recent advances in surgical treatment — including collagen cross-linking, intracorneal ring implants (Intacs), and partial-thickness corneal transplants — none of the currently available surgeries can make the distorted keratoconic cornea quite as smooth as the surface of a rigid contact lens.  The uniform surface of a rigid lens masks the distorted, irregular cornea in keratoconus, allowing light to properly focus into the eye. 

Continue Reading
Posted In: Treatment Options

Patient Success Stories

“I saw for the first time – the world as it really looks”

“I have SynergEyes UltraHealth Contact Lens in both eyes. I have worn them daily at least 15 hours, even once 22 hours straight.

I have been wearing them now for over 6 months and my vision is superb, comfort supreme, not cloudy, not blurry, and no pain. I am 66 years old, was diagnosed with Keratoconus over 50 years ago,

Continue Reading
Posted In: Patient Stories

An Introduction to Keratoconus

Keratoconus in an eye disease that is characterized by thinning and steepening of the cornea. The cornea is the front surface of the eye and the most important focusing element of the vision system. In patients who have keratoconus their cornea is cone shaped. The name keratoconus is derived from the Greek word for cornea (‘kerato’) and cone shaped (‘conus’). Keratoconus results in visual distortion often not correctable by traditional glasses. The thinning and steepening of the cornea causes the front surface to become progressively more irregular in shape.

Continue Reading
Scroll Up